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NIHR ARC OxTV and the University of Oxford's Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences launch materials to support healthcare professionals in providing evidence-based recommendations to reduce the intake of saturated fat to help lower LDL cholesterol and salt to reduce blood pressure.

An image of the cover of the reducing salt and saturated fat patient booklets and nurse checklists.

The patient information booklets ‘Cutting down on saturated fat’ and ‘Cutting down on salt’, as well as the accompanying nurse checklists have been developed based on two NIHR supported research projects from the ARC OxTVs Health Behaviours research theme: The PCShop study and the SaltSwap study

The booklets were used in the these recent trials to support healthcare professionals to make evidence-based suggested dietary changes to help prevent cardiovascular disease, and were well received by nurses and patients within these studies.

As such, the NIHR ARC OxTV and the University of Oxford's Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences have worked to make these resources available more broadly and freely. 

We recommend healthcare professionals using the checklist alongside the booklet as it was developed to support them in explaining the booklets to patients and to give guidance on what information to focus on.

The booklets were not themselves the subject of research, though they were developed based on up-to-date nutritional and  behaviour change evidence.  

The brochures are free for use by healthcare professionals and for private use and can be downloaded or ordered by clicking here.

The .pdf versions of these documents are available to download for free . We would, however, encourage you to use a professional printer for the patient booklets as they were designed in full colour with this in mind.

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