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<jats:sec><jats:title>Objective:</jats:title><jats:p> Identifying women at risk of depression and anxiety during pregnancy provides an opportunity to improve health outcomes for women and their children. One barrier to screening is the availability of validated measures in the woman’s language. Afghanistan is one of the largest source countries for refugees yet there is no validated measure in Dari to screen for symptoms of perinatal depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to assess the screening properties of a Dari translation of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods:</jats:title><jats:p> This cross-sectional study administered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale Dari version to 52 Dari-speaking women at a public pregnancy clinic in Melbourne, Australia. A clinical interview using the depressive and anxiety disorders modules from the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.) was also conducted. Interview material was presented to an expert panel to achieve consensus diagnoses. The interview and diagnostic process was undertaken blind to Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale screening results. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results:</jats:title><jats:p> Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale Dari version was good (α = 0.79). Criterion validity was assessed using the receiver operating characteristics curve and generated excellent classification accuracy for depression diagnosis (0.90; 95% confidence interval [0.82, 0.99]) and for anxiety diagnosis (0.94; 95% confidence interval [0.88, 1.00]). For depression, a cut-off score of 9, as recommended for culturally and linguistically diverse groups, demonstrated high sensitivity (1.00; 95% confidence interval [0.79, 1.00]) and specificity (0.88; 95% confidence interval [0.73, 0.97]). For anxiety, a cut-off score of ⩾5 provided the best balance of sensitivity (1.00; 95% confidence interval [0.72, 1.00]) and specificity (0.80; 95% confidence interval [0.65, 0.91]). </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusion:</jats:title><jats:p> These results support the use of this Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale Dari version to screen for symptoms of depression and anxiety during pregnancy as well as the use of a lowered cut-off score. </jats:p></jats:sec>

Original publication

DOI

10.1177/00048674211025687

Type

Journal article

Journal

Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Publication Date

10/07/2021

Pages

000486742110256 - 000486742110256