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ARC OxTV Mental Health across the Lifecourse theme lead, Professor Cathy Creswell is among a number of UK academics calling, in Journal of Mental Health, for targets for mental health research in order to meet the healthcare challenges of the next decade.

Photo of tiles arranged to say 'mental health'

The treatment of mental illness currently brings substantial costs to individuals, the NHS, and also to wider society. The need for innovation to promote good mental health has never been greater. In an effort to catalyse this innovation, researchers have set out four ambitious targets:

  1. Halve the number of children and young people experiencing persistent mental health problems
  2. Improve our understanding of the links between physical and mental health, and eliminate the mortality gap
  3. Increase the number of new and improved treatments, interventions and supports for mental health problems
  4. Improve the availability of choices and access to mental health care, treatment and support in hospital and community settings

The number of goals was limited to four in an effort to easily promote cross-sector partnerships, and to track their impacts.

The research comes at a particularly pertinent time. At least 1 in 6 adults in the UK is likely to experience mental health difficulties in any given week, and the British Medical Association has recently warned that the mental health consequences of COVID-19 will be “considerable”.

The research has been welcomed by several sector voices, including funders, researchers, and NHS Trusts.

Professor Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer and co-lead of the National Institute for Health Research, said:

 

'Few could disagree that mental health research is crucial in driving innovation in current mental health care and in bringing hope for the future. Working with clinicians, academics, major mental health research funders, mental health research charities and representatives from service user groups, as well as representatives from Public Health England and NHS England has been key to identifying those areas of most concern and transforming them into four distinct research goals, which the mental health community can sign up to.'

Professor Cathy Creswell, co-author from the Departments of Psychiatry and Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, said:

'The pandemic has shone a light on the need for huge strides forward in mental health research and practice. These goals provide a focus for research efforts by addressing key priorities as identified by a broad range of stakeholders, in particular the needs of children and young people, the physical health burdens associated with poor mental health, and the need for improved access and choice when it comes to promoting good mental health and preventing and treating mental health problems'

Professor Elaine Fox of the University of Oxford, said:

'National high-level goals that focus our research efforts are an important part of ensuring that good will and good intentions are translated into genuine innovations and impact.'

Lea Milligan, CEO of MQ Mental Health Research, said:

'MQ’s vision is to create a world where mental illnesses are understood, effectively treated and one day preventable. The research goals that came from an extensive consultation are an opportunity for us bring the mental health research community together in a united and impactful way like never before.'

The four goals were produced following a consultation process that was organised by the Department of Health and Social Care and convened by the Chief Medical Officer. The views of service users and service user organisations supported this activity, as well as research support from the National Institute for Health Research’s Clinical Research Network.

 

To read the full story visit the University of Oxford Department of Psychiatry here.

To read the full paper, Shared goals for mental health research: what, why and when for the 2020s.

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