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The NIHR Incubator for Mental Health Research, led by Professor Cathy Creswell, ARC OxTV Mental Health Across the Lifecourse theme lead, recently launched a new interactive map to support mental health researchers, at all career stages, across the nation to connect and collaborate with others.

A screen capture of the new interactive map of the NIHR Incubator for Mental Health research

The Incubator for Mental Health Research offers practical advice, connections and career development opportunities for aspiring researchers in mental health, signposts career development opportunities – funding, networking and mentoring – for both clinical and non-clinical professionals at all career stages. 

One of the first initiatives for the incubator is a researcher map, which will help us understand and illustrate where mental health research is and isn't happening. The interactive map of mental health research supports mental health researchers at all career stages to connect and collaborate with others.

We desperately need to build research capacity in mental health. Inspiring and engaging people to pursue mental health research careers in clinical and non-clinical settings is a big part of that. My hope is that we now start seeing a far wider group of people and organisations, reflecting diverse professions and geographies, engaging in mental health research because that’s how we’ll start driving the changes we need as a society.
- Professor Cathy Creswell

The career development section offers advice for those just getting started and also helps connect all aspiring researchers to the main opportunities in mental health research. This includes the mental health biomedical research centres, applied research collaborations and UKRI mental health research networks. Profession-specific pages offer specific advice for psychologists, medics, behavioural scientists, nurses, social workers, allied health professionals, basic scientists, and peer researchers.

The career case study section features over 30 case studies of researchers from a wide range of different backgrounds who are pursuing mental health research today.

 

You can follow the Incubator on Twitter for advice, inspiration and connections @MHRincubator


Plot your research activity on the map of mental health research: https://mentalhealthresearch.org.uk/map

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